Archive for the ‘Halacha’ Category

Shoftim

Monday, September 5th, 2011

We have a minhag to blow shofer every day in Elul except for Shabbos.  The source for the minhag to blow Shofar is brought by The Tur, who quotes the Pirkei D’Rebbi Eliezer.  When Moshe Rabbenu went up to heaven to receive the 2nd set of the 10 commandments on Rosh Chodesh Elul and remained there for 40 days, until Yom Kippur. On the day he went up the shofar was blown. We also blow the shofer to motivate us to do teshuva. The sound of the shofar puts fear in our hearts as the Navi notes.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

Parshas Porah

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

Some are of the opinion that the reading of Parshas Porah is a Torah mitzvah. One should make every effort to be in shul for its reading. Parshas Porah is part of the preparation for the upcoming Yom Tov of Pesach. The need to be “tohor” for the Korbon Pesach.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

Purim

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

On Purim it is mitzvah to give zedakah. One does not check credentials on this day. However, it is important to give money to people in need who are poor v. organizations and institutions.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

Adar I – Yahrzeit

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011

When does one observe a Yahrzeit if the date was in a year where there was only one Adar? There are numerous opinions. Some say we keep Adar II (Like we do Purim). Others hold we keep both Adar I and Adar II.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

La’g B’Omer

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

When La’g B’Omer falls out on a Sunday like this year the Rema allows one to take a haircut Friday in honor of Shabbos. Sefardim still wait until Monday.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

Chanukah

Friday, December 11th, 2009

On Erev Shabbos we light the Chanukah candles first and then the Shabbos candles. On Motzaei Shabbos we make Havdalah first and then light the Chanukah candles. That is the accepted custom.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

Chanukah

Thursday, December 10th, 2009

If the husband is home and it is time to light the Chanukah candles but his wife will not be home until later – what should he do? Light now in the proper time or wait until his wife returns?

He should wait. Shalom Bayis is greater. That is why if a person has limited funds Shabbos candles come before Chanukah candles.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

Chanukah

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

The candles should burn at least half an hour after the stars come out. If one lights after sunset (or Friday evening) one should make sure the candles / oil can last at least 1 1/2 hours until Zeis Hakochavim.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

Chanukah

Monday, December 7th, 2009

There are various opinions when the correct time to light the Chanukah candles is. R’ Moshe Feinstein felt the candles should be lit 10 minutes after sunset. Others hold we wait until the stars come out (Tzes Hakochavim). Candles should burn at least half an hour after the stars come out.

On Friday night  (twice this year) the candles must be lit before sunset and should burn long enough to last until half an hour after the stars come out.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks

Halacha

Sunday, December 6th, 2009

The Torah / Shulchan Oruch approaches legal issues often differently than the average person. For example you go Chanukah shopping with your young child and while in the store he breaks something. Who is responsible. Logic syas the child or his parent. Halacha says differently. A child is not responsible for his actions so is not obligated to pay. Neither is the parent. It becomes the store owners loss. Possibly when the child becomes an adult he could pay if he so desires but is under no obligation.

Written by: Rabbi Ephraim Bryks